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Viktor II EFI Gen 3 Hemi 7179 with Procharger

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  • Viktor II EFI Gen 3 Hemi 7179 with Procharger

    Hello, I' just installing an Procharger Kit to my Hemi. What to do with the PCV System from the Viktor Intake 7179? Keep the PCV valve connected? There is no more vacuum at the intake front.
    Anyone who could tell me what to do?

  • #2
    No PCV valve used.
    Oil catch can in place of the PCV valve. Then feed it to the air filter to get the vapors out of the motor.
    Some people have tried vacuum pumps with mixed results.
    In my neighborhood, if you open your hood to check your oil, and the vehicle still runs after you close it.......Then your labeled the Neighborhood Mechanic.
    https://forums.edelbrock.com/filedat...?photoid=42773

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    • #3
      Thanks, just to make shure because my English is not so good (I´m from Austria/Europe). I will get an open system, no connection to the intake tube, not burn the vapors any more? If the pressure in the crank case is higher then outside vapors will flow.
      Shell I keep the connection from the oilfill support to the intake hose or place a filter instead of the oilcap?

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      • #4
        I will buy one of these https://www.mfeuk.co.uk/provent-400/ and bring the oil back

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        • #5
          In America we generally use Moroso products: https://www.moroso.com/moroso-shop-browse/60000/

          So. Generally.
          One valve cover will have a breather or filter on it...this is so fresh filtered air can come into the motor.

          ​​​​​​The other valve cover needs a "splash shield" inside the valve cover....more about this later.

          From the​​​​ valve cover with the splash shield. You send a hose to the input of the oil separator.

          The output of the oil separator goes to a 3/8" hose connection on the air filter.....this is the suck out the bad fumes part.

          Tricky part:
          Start the motor, and drive it around.
          If too much oil is being sucked into the separator...should only be about 4 to 5 spoonfuls after 1000 miles.... that's every day miles. Not racing miles.
          Then the "splash shield" in the valve cover needs some improvements. It might need to be made larger, or loosely filled with some sheets of "perforated" metal....that's a sheet of metal, with a bunch of holes in it.

          If that doesn't work in keeping the oil consumption down. Then you will need to add a adjustable valve on the separators input, or output....do to the laws of physics. You try both locations to see which works best.


          Normally I put a vacuum gauge on the dipstick tube when I'm testing PCV valves.... basically I'm just looking for a couple of inches. Not much. Just enough so I know that the motor is being ventilated...fumes being sucked into the motor.....Note: Dipstick tube can not be in the oil for this test to work.

          If you have pressure build up inside the motor. Then the front, and rear crank seals will start leaking....with a forced intake motor. You could be getting extra ring blow-by on the intake stroke. So you should try the vacuum test I posted above.
          And. If the motor is in the building stage. Make sure the dipstick tube is not in the oil....you can use a tubing cutter to shorten it.
          ​​​
          Edit:: Almost forgot. You don't bring the oil back. You have a valve on the bottom of the separator, that you open once every couple of months to empty it.
          Last edited by BITE_ME; 09-25-2020, 01:53 PM.
          In my neighborhood, if you open your hood to check your oil, and the vehicle still runs after you close it.......Then your labeled the Neighborhood Mechanic.
          https://forums.edelbrock.com/filedat...?photoid=42773

          Comment


          • #6
            InkedPCV_LI.jpg Thank´s for this explanation.
            So 1-2 on my picture is the breather, wich I could replace with a filter (picture 2)
            And the output of the oil seperator (4) should be connected to (2) to bring the vapor back to burning.

            Breather_filter.jpg

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            • #7
              The pictures are stock situation

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              • #8
                This girl did a nice write-up about using the catch cans: https://www.superchargerforums.com/t...re-blown.2472/
                You might have the option to translate it into a language you can understand better... usually upper right side of your web browser.

                Basically she shows you to "kind of" leave the stock PCV stuff alone.....but you add a catch can, and one way check valve to it?.....it's hard for me to tell what was stock ( factory ), and what is added in her diagram. Do to the fact the motor is not in front of me, and I don't have any shop manuals for Dodge, Chrysler, Plymouth.

                You can see in the 2nd, and 3rd diagram that a catch can has been added just for the supercharger ( red arrows ). But it's in combination with the PCV valve system too.

                So....in different words.

                The second picture is for when the motor has no boost ( under a vacuum in the intake manifold ).
                The check valve is so a back fire through the intake manifold, will not blow-up the gasses in the "block".
                The catch can on the throttle body is just letting clean filtered air ( from the air filter ) into the block....this connection is between the MAF sensor, and supercharger


                The 3rd picture is for when the motor has boost.
                The check valve will now close off the PCV valve.
                The catch can on the throttle body is now separating the gasses/oil from the block ( it was just letting air in before ), and feeding the filtered air to the MAF sensor.


                If you Email, or call Moroso. I'm sure they must have a single combination catch can for your motor.
                In my neighborhood, if you open your hood to check your oil, and the vehicle still runs after you close it.......Then your labeled the Neighborhood Mechanic.
                https://forums.edelbrock.com/filedat...?photoid=42773

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thank´s that good explanation from Vanessa, but as far as I know, my Hemi has no MAF. I think I that will not be a problem and I know how to built my system now.

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                  • #10
                    Cool. Good luck.
                    In my neighborhood, if you open your hood to check your oil, and the vehicle still runs after you close it.......Then your labeled the Neighborhood Mechanic.
                    https://forums.edelbrock.com/filedat...?photoid=42773

                    Comment

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