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EFI signal Pertronic III, no go....so says Pertonic...

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  • EFI signal Pertronic III, no go....so says Pertonic...

    So Ready to run MSD? and street fire? Comments etc...

  • #2
    You can't use a multiple spark device as a signal to a ECU unit. You have to use some kind of converter. Like the tach output of a MSD type box ( Pertronix makes a box too ).

    The ready to run distributor's use a VR ( the V stands for Variable ) sensor. They don't general play well with EFI units either.

    Hall-Effect sensors ( some people think that VR and Hall-Effect are the same...But there not. So lots of confusion on the internet ) use a magnet, sensor, and a metal vane.
    The sensor has a Schmidt circuit inside that filters the signal. So it sends a perfect signal to the EFI to use.

    Factory camshaft, and crank position sensors are basically like the VR sensor. But do to the fact they designed them to work on "specific" motors, on "specific" vehicles, with "specific" wirring routing. You end up having the possibility of not having a good signal. If you place the wires 2" in the no-go zone.

    So. It's basically a Hall-Effect sensor, or some type of converter box to have a "reliable" system.
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    • #3
      Thanks for the post! So here is what I got. Pertronic III distributor (multi-spark) which will not work with E-Street 2...due to a faulty signal possibility. What I believe you're indicating is I just need a MSD tach signal for the ECU, like the MSD Street fire (Cheap)...but not using the mult-spark which doesn't jive with the pertronic mult-spark...Question: How does the Street Fire get its signal to send to the tach...

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      • #4
        Seems the Flamethrower Pertronic is a halls effect distributor but it's mult-spark so " No go" ??

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        • #5
          You kind of got it right. Let me break it down some more.

          1. All EFI units need a 100% clean tach signal. That's one pulse per cylinder firing. A 12 Volt square wave signal....a square wave signal just means it goes "positive", then "negative" for "each" cylinder that's firing. There should be no "curves" ( VR sensor ), or strange spikes ( points bounce, or multiple triggers ) on the connection.
          Note: Most Tachs will accept a junky signal. So just because a tach works on what ever you have now. It may not be clean enough to drive a EFI unit.
          Note 2: HEI chips ( these chips are used in almost every vehicle. Not just GM's ) and the Pertronix 2, and 3 use a "current sensing" module to drive a coil. Their great at protecting them selves. But they freak out when their not connected to a coil. They need to have some type of load to work ( like a coil ).


          2. MSD ( Multiple Spark Discharge units....there's lots of brand names. MSD Ignition took the best one ). Will general take any type of signal ( they have different wired in puts, for the different types of signal inputs....MSD wrote a small book on how just to wire all the different inputs ).
          Anyway. The boxes have a dedicated "Tach" output. It's not a EFI output. But on most units ( Google is your friend, and some people have posted which ones work, and don't on this, and other forums ) it works to trigger the EFI units.
          I belive the Pertronix box ( they only make one ) was designed to drive a EFI, and I think some one made a box with 2 outputs.
          Why 2 outputs? Because some Tachs degrade the signal from the box, so the EFI will some times flake out when connected to the same wire.
          Note: Manufacturers please put 2 "isolated" outputs on your boxes.
          Note 2: Some MSD type boxes actually send a higher voltage, then battery voltage to the coil ( you can tell if it does by the "warning" Do Not Connect Tach To The Coil ). These types of boxes are terrible for EFI conversions, that have to have a Tach connected..... To make it simple, and clean. You need a box that has a good Tach output wire for the EFI, and you can connect your Dash Tach to the coil.<----Most Important Part Of This Post!!

          CD ( Capacitor Discharge ) boxes. These things are crazy ( from a Radio Frequency Interference sort of way...your AM and FM Radio in your car will not work, if the CD box is poorly designed ). General these connect to distributors that have no circuitry to drive a coil. VR or magnetic triggers are basically used. True race cars use these.


          MSD and CD combination. Do to some manufacturers marketing departments. You really have to study/investigate what your purchasing. The best tip is to read their instillation manuals. Look for a unit that you connect a tach to the coil, and has a good Tach output wire.


          PS. I still have a very old Malory box unit. That only has 1 part in it....it's a 40 Watt stereo amp chip, and it's bulletproof. Now all the box's have hundreds of parts.
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          • #6
            Originally posted by Bearclawjj View Post
            Seems the Flamethrower Pertronic is a halls effect distributor but it's mult-spark so " No go" ??
            www.pertronix.com/prod/ig/strike/default.aspx
            This will work with Pertronix 1, and 2.

            So. I would look into changing the module.
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            • #7
              Hi..as per my knowledge Hall-Effect sensors use a magnet, sensor, and a metal vane.The sensor has a Schmidt circuit inside that filters the signal. So it sends a perfect signal to the EFI to use.Factory camshaft, and crank position sensors are basically like the VR sensor. But do to the fact they designed them to work on specific motors.

              pcb assembly
              Last edited by NealXu; 01-16-2018, 02:15 PM.

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              • #8
                The VR sensor's ouput generally is very small ( voltage wise ). So it is some times effected by other wires that are close by. In a factory car this is no big deal. In a vehicle that is none factory wired. You some times need to move the wires around to get the sensor to work reliably.

                The most "accurate" position sensors are laser or light sensors. But their more expensive, and they can't be used in very hot locations.... They are my favorite sensor, do to their accuracy.
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